OO Gauge Farm Fences

If you model any period, from the start of the steam age to the present day, farm and lineside fences are probably a must-have for your layout.

Combined with our wide selection of gates, all your little people and animals will be safely contained and kept away from those trains. 

Why choose our OO Gauge Farm Fences?

The History of Fences

Railway Fencing

Farm Fencing

OO Gauge Farm Fences

The benefits of using Fences made from Card Due to the laser-cutting process, the fences are effectively pre-weathered, and don't require painting. If you do need to paint them, then we recommend acrylics and light dry-brushing. The benefits of using Fences made from Laserboard These are ready to use in a natural new-wood coloured finish but can be painted, if required. Using laserboard allows much finer detail to be added, such as spear tops and trellis lattices.

Showing products 1 to 20 of 20

Why choose our OO Gauge Farm Fences?

At Scale Model Scenery, we try to make everything we create 'realistically' better'. And that goes for all of our smaller products, such as the OO Gauge Farm Fences. We're confident we are the top choice for railways modellers and diorama creators. Here's why:

The History of Fences

For centuries, throughout the world, agricultural walls and fences were made to keep both wild and domesticated animals out of certain areas, such as gardens or crop fields. In the United Kingdom, the law is different for private land and common land. On private land it is the owner's responsibility to fence livestock in, but it is the responsibility of landowners bordering a common to fence the common's livestock out.

Early fences were made from whatever material was available to hand, whether that was stone, timber or earth. 

On more rugged and hilly areas where the grassed areas were littered with stones, during ploughing or sowing times these were removed to the edges of the crop field. Over time, these piles became the walls of the fields. In the UK especially, how the stone walls are constructed very much defines the location, Yorkshire dry stone walls and Cornish 'hedges' being two well-known examples.

Where wood was plentiful, splitting logs and forcing them vertically into the ground and connecting these posts with rails was a cheap and effective method of creating a barrier. Other types of wood fences could be made from weaving hazel or willow into panels.

An earth barrier, or 'ha-ha', was constructed by digging a ditch with one steep side, which animals couldn't clamber up, and one gentle slope.  

Railway Fencing

With the increase in the numbers of Acts of Parliaments allowing Railways to be built, the various Regulation of Railways Acts required railways to be fenced. The original statutory requirement was for them to be fenced against trespass from the railway onto the surrounding land, and to keep animals off.

Farm Fencing

The style of a farm fence is very much a related to the environment and area in which they are used. Wattle fences may be one of the oldest types of fencing still in use today. Beginning in the Bronze Age, when knives, saws, and hatchets came into use, many early Europeans developed wattle work. Wooden fences predominate where timber is in plentiful supply, or where animals need to be contained and are likely to push against the fence. Wire fences are much cheaper and can be used where there is less need for strong containment of animals. Early wire fences were not successful, as the wire was prone to weather damage. It wasn't until the Bessemer process, of creating steel wire, that this method became more widespread and successful.